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Bet You’ve Never Seen A Train Do This, Lucky Excavator!

I bet if you have worked on the railroad for any length of time, you have probably not had a day like this. These guys seem to be having a bit of difficulty with a stuck excavator, and how fortuitous that a locomotive just happened to be riding by. This bad day for the excavator operator is about to get a whole lot better… maybe.

The Problem with a Stuck Excavator

Now, I’m not sure if you have ever had the pleasure of being stuck in an excavator. No doubt you have probably seen one stuck in the mud a time or two while driving by in the safety and convenience of your automobile. If you live in an area of the country that receives plenty of rain, this is a fairly common site. Those excavators will get stuck tread deep in the mud, and it seems as if there is no way out. There is, it just typically involves waiting for the sun to come out and dry up the ground. Once that happens, the excavator simply crawls out of that hole on good old terra firma. However, sometimes you don’t have that option. Sometimes, you are on a job site and time is of the essence.

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So the question of the hour is what do you do when you’re 25 ton excavator gets stuck in the mud by the side of the railroad tracks? Well, there are several options. You could try to slide and steer your way out. Many skilled excavators have found their way out of situations on more than one occasion using this method. It takes a skillful, steady hand to perform, and kahunas of steel too. These are not tinker toys after all. These are massively large pieces of construction equipment. One wrong move and you could get stuck worse, or end up laying it over. Either scenario is not good. Plus, this only works if there is no concern for surrounding vegetation. Sometimes laws dictate what you can and cannot dig up or around. I’m not really sure what the legal requirements were surrounding this particular piece of land, but this is a non-issue anyway my friends.

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That is not the case here though my friends. How do I know that you may ask? Well, I did a little bit of digging, no pun intended. As it turns out, the excavator operator’s name